Why is Protein Important for Exercise?

October 1, 2019

When people hear “protein” and “exercise” in the same sentence, they’re most likely to picture images of bodybuilders eating tons of chicken and drinking protein shakes in order to maximise their gains. Protein is important for everyone who is hitting the gym, playing sports, going for runs or doing any other form of exercise, not just the pros.

Protein is a macronutrient. To put it simply, protein is one of the main nutrients that every person needs to maintain a healthy body. It helps to repair any internal or external damage, supports the immune system and contributes to an overall feeling of wellbeing. At a cellular level, proteins are used for just about everything, from transporting messages, carry out the instructions of DNA and defending, preserving and repairing essential life functions.

Protein, Nutrition and Exercise

It doesn’t matter which way you look at it, protein is essential for exercise. Anyone undertaking any kind of exercise routine is definitely going to need more protein than someone who doesn’t. This is because when you exercise, you are effectively tearing and breaking muscle fibres apart, which then need to be repaired by the body, which requires protein.

How to Get Enough Protein on a Plant Based Diet

From a dietary point of view, you can get enough day to day protein from eating food such as beans, soy protein products, nuts and other such foods. If you are exercising, it is beneficial to supplement this normal intake of protein with additional food items such as protein bars, powders or shakes. Trek Protein Energy Bars come in a variety of delicious flavours. They’re vegan, gluten free and are packed with 10g of protein.

Repair, Maintain, Grow

Protein is especially important to consume after a workout, as during exercise you are effectively breaking your muscles down. That is why it’s common to see people at the gym eating protein bars or drinking whey shakes when they have finished their routine. It helps to increase the impact of their exercise. It’s also important to mix this protein with carbohydrates as they helps your body to absorb the protein and turn it into more muscle mass.

If you are exercising but find yourself with low energy or feel that you are not building any muscle, it may be down to not having enough protein in your diet. Make an effort to eat more protein through your meals and supplement your intake with protein-rich snacks like Trek Protein Flapjacks and Protein Nut Bars. You should start to feel better and get better results for all of your hard work.

Looking for protein snacks?

If you’re looking for natural, vegan, gluten and dairy free, plant-based protein bars, the Trek range is bound to have the right flavour and texture for you. Explore the Trek Protein Bar range today.

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What are Macronutrients?

When we consider the nutritional needs of the body in order to survive and function, we can broadly divide or define the diet into macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein and fat), and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals).

What are Micronutrients?

While macronutrients supply us with the necessary calories (energy) to move and function on a daily basis, micronutrients are the “spark plugs” that literally turn on the ignition, helping the body to effectively and efficiently utilise calories, and driving the many biochemical reactions that occur in our cells.

Slow Energy Release Foods

We’ve all been there – that low grumble that happens between meal times that makes us realise that we could do with a snack. Depending on what we have nearest to us, there’s always the risk of grabbing a pastry, packet of crisps or chocolate which are often unhealthy options. Instead, you can prevent those snack attacks by eating foods that keep you fuller for longer!