Slow Energy Release Foods

October 1, 2019

We’ve all been there – that low grumble that happens between meal times that makes us realise that we could do with a snack. Depending on what we have nearest to us, there’s always the risk of grabbing a pastry, packet of crisps or chocolate which are often unhealthy options. Instead, you can prevent those snack attacks by eating foods that keep you fuller for longer, and give you a slow energy release to keep you going! 

A rule of thumb is to focus on eating foods that are as unprocessed as possible, promoting better blood sugar balance and better digestion which lead to better weight control. Here are some foods that we recommend!

Protein, Protein, Protein!

Proteins are essential for bodily functions in pretty much every way. They leave us feeling fuller because their complex structures take longer to digest. It can be easy to get a good portion of protein with lunch and dinner, but what about breakfast? You could always make an omelette. There are so many ways to tailor it to your tastes. Add some cheese, vegetables and other healthy ingredients to make a  delicious morning meal. If you need to snack, have a Trek Protein Energy Bar. They’re packed with 10g of plant-based protein to keep you going. For lunch or dinner, try soya alternatives with a salad.

Good grains and carbs!

Some people may think that staying away from carbs is the best way to lose or maintain weight – the truth is that our bodies need carbohydrates to keep us going and cutting these out may leave us feeling tired.

Instead of cutting your intake, eat more wholegrain and complex carbohydrates, like Trek Protein Flapjacks which give you a slow energy release. This way you are still giving your body the natural nutrition it needs, but you will lower the chances of snacking on less healthy alternatives once hunger hits. Barley, oats, brown rice, wholemeal bread and crackers all provide sustained release energy and are really suitable for most meal plans.

Beans are brilliant!

Known as one of natures ‘superfoods’ beans are one of nature’s best sources of nutrition. They contain both complex carbohydrates, proteins and fibre that’ll keep you fuller for lunger. Best of all, they’re incredibly versatile and suitable for most dietary requirements. Try black beans, lentils, pinto beans and green beans to see which you like best and fit them in with your meals to give your body great nutrition and longer lasting satisfaction.

DISCOVER MORE

Why is Protein Important for Exercise?

Protein is a macronutrient. To put it simply, protein is one of the main nutrients that every person needs to maintain a healthy body. It helps to repair any internal or external damage, supports the immune system and contributes to an overall feeling of wellbeing.

What are Macronutrients?

When we consider the nutritional needs of the body in order to survive and function, we can broadly divide or define the diet into macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein and fat), and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals).

What are Micronutrients?

While macronutrients supply us with the necessary calories (energy) to move and function on a daily basis, micronutrients are the “spark plugs” that literally turn on the ignition, helping the body to effectively and efficiently utilise calories, and driving the many biochemical reactions that occur in our cells.